One Apple A Day #831 – Wisdom

This morning I want to start a little new challenge. A few months ago, I bought a set of cards about strengths. They are great in workshops or coaching sessions to identify our strengths so we can use them as levers to create changes in our lives or to solve our challenges.

Unfortunately, due to this pandemic, I haven’t been able to use them properly. Tired of seeing them laying on my desk, I decided to use them differently. For the next days, every morning I’ll pick a card and write about it. There are quite a few cards on the deck, so I think I have enough material for the rest of this crazy year.

Anyway, without farther ado, let’s begin with the first card; wisdom.

The dictionary says that it is the ability to use your knowledge and experience to make good decisions and judgments.

On Wikipedia, they add understanding, common sense and insight to the recipe. And these are three fundamental ingredients because they make quite clear that wisdom is not about knowing a lot.

It’s not the amount of knowledge or experiences that make you wise. It is the ability to sense into what you know and don’t know and source your words, choices and actions from there. 

I think we are wise anytime we remove the duality between sensing and making sense. 

Uh, time flies. I need to use it more wisely next time. 

Let’s close this post with some wisdom from someone wiser than me.

“The saddest aspect of life right now is that science gathers knowledge faster than society gathers wisdom.”

Isaac Asimov

One Apple A Day #807 – my voice

“Raise your words, 

not your voice, 

it’s rain that grows flowers, 

not thunder.” 

Jalal al-Din Rumi

These words keep coming back in different ways and contexts. So, there must be something they are trying to tell me. 

Maybe it is something about my tendency to step back and hold my words to avoid confrontations. I struggle to share my opinion and to speak my truth outside my family. Perhaps because I know that, no matter what, my family will always love me.

Out there, however, it’s different. 

It’s crowded, messy and noisy. 

Many are shouting; some only to cover the voice of others, others just to be heard once. Unfortunately, like with my old stereo, when the volume is too high, the sound comes out distorted, until it’s not music anymore but just noise.

So, maybe this is the invitation that Rumi has for me. 

To make it rain.

To find my voice.

So my words can be heard.

One Apple A Day #786 – a sign of clarity

I love quotes and aphorisms. 

I love Italian hermetic poetry and Japanese Haiku. 

I’m in awe by the ability to pack so much meaning and emotions in just a few words.

It is as if, once we remove all decorations and embellishments, what we are left is the essence of the message.

And each one of those remaining words carries so much meaning, so much power.

In an interview, Mary Oliver said: “[…]if you can say it in a few lines, you’re just decorating for the rest of it. Unless you could — intent makes something more intense, but if you said what you want to say, you’re not going to make it more intense. You’re just going to repeat yourself.”

Yet, it’s not easy. Sometimes I overflow people with words.

I noticed that usually when I am not clear about what I want to communicate, I become verbose. But when I can feel it; when the message is crystal clear in my mind and my heart, then the right words emerge, and no decorations are needed.

One Apple A Day #676 – the wisdom of curiosity

“Words are the representations and symbols we use to view, think about, and process our perceptions of reality and they are the means of sharing these perceptions with others.” – Judith Glaser

Words are powerful; they shape the reality we experience. 

One word can trap you into a life you never wanted. One word can break the walls and liberate you. 

Just yesterday, I was reflecting, with one of my mentors, about my struggle in picking a label for what I do. But that’s for another day.

Last weekend I read an interesting article on how schools are killing curiosityMaybe this is why that word came back this morning in my meditation.

I did a quick check online, and learned that “curious” comes from Latin curiosus meaning “careful, diligent; inquiring eagerly, meddlesome”. The word is akin to cura, “care”. 

What really kindled my curiosity is that the word “care” comes from Latin “cura”. Modern linguists believe that “cura” derived from the root ku-/kav- meaning “observe”. From the same root comes the Sanskrit word “kavi”, meaning “sage”.

In my mind, all of this means that being curious is the way to and a trait of wisdom.

Being curious is better than being smart. It is desire, not intelligence, that prompts behaviour. – James Clear